Category Archives: Reggae/Ska

Lloyd and Glen — That Girl


Enjoy!

Friday Night Lovers Rock

And the party goes on … It’s Lovers Friday with a lot of Lovers Rock. So, let’s take it easy with lots of ice cold  drinks and some rocking Reggae …

Playlist

Moonlight Groover — Winston Wright

My Whole World — Beres Hammond

Teenager In Love — Bob Marley

All My Loving — Prince Buster

What Does It Take — Alton Ellis

Spanish Lace — Byron Lee and the Dragonaires

You Make Me Feel Brnad New —  Boris Gardiner

My Precious Love — Desmond Dekker

Dreams To Remember — Toots and The Maytals

To Love Somebody — Busty Brown

Guava Jelly — Johnny Nash

Love At First Sight — Brentford Rd. All Stars

Whine And Grine — Prince Buster

Prisoner of Love — Prisoner of Love

Enjoy!

Laurel Aitken Special

I’m in a Ska mood today. So, let’s hear some Laurel Aitken.

Something’s Gotta Be Wrong (Superstar, CD 2005, Liquidator)
Take Off My Pyjamas (Godfather of Ska, Grover, 2000)
Woman Is Sweeter (Raggedy says: Yessssssss!) (Godfather of Ska)

Reggae on!

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Have a happy Sunday — Reggae Sunday that is — everybody. I hope I will be able to post regularly again. It’s been quite busy around here, but as it looks now, things are back to normal.

So here we go!

Playlist

John Holt — Ali Baba

Bob Marley & The Wailers — Keep On Moving

Eric “Monty” Morris — Jenny

The Gladiators — Big Boo Boo Day

Enjoy!

zip

Reggae Sunday @SOTS with Laurel Aitken — Soul Jerker

… and your old Raggedy is back again with some fine Reggae.

 You have to get this album!

Enjoy!

Sealmakers — Pretty Face Girl / She Said She Loves Me

How about a Reggae Monday?

The story that comes with these songs is that the Sealmakers are actually no one else than the Gladiators.

Pretty Face Girl

She Said She Loves Me

Lee Perry — Isn’t It Wrong

 

I hope you all have a great weekend because it would be wrong not to enjoy life.

Enjoy!

Mediafire

Joe Higgs — Captivity

Enjoy!

“… Born in Kingston in 1940, Higgs’ career began as a songwriter for seminal reggae acts such as Toots & the Maytals and Delroy Wilson. While establishing himself as an in-demand songwriter, Higgs was also developing a solo vocal career as well as working as a high school music teacher. The role of teacher suited Higgs and he was soon working regularly as a vocal arranger, a coach, and a guitar instructor. The most famous of his pupils was Bob Marley. It was under Higgs’ tutelage that Marley’s guitar playing greatly improved but, more significantly, it was Higgs who arranged the beautiful trio singing of Marley and fellow Wailers Peter Tosh and Bunny Livingstone (later Bunny Wailer). …”

(http://www.allmusic.com/artist/joe-higgs-p2892/biography)

Happy Reggae Sunday! Sweet Reggae on a Cold Day …

It is cold here in San Antonio — which makes this Sunday a perfect enjoy-your-couch day. An upbeat Reggae medley will take the edge off the chill and brighten the dreary day with a ray of Jamaican sunshine. So, after all, this Sunday will be a perfect one.

I need some sweet Reggae music. How about you? Oh yeah — don’t forget to get off that couch and dance!

 

Playlist:

Desmond Dekker — Trample

The Heptones — Party Time

The Mighty Maytones — Madness

Toots and The Maytals — Higher Ground

Justin Hinds and The Dominoes — Never Too Old

Toots and The Maytals — Know Me Good

Enjoy!

zip

 

 

 

 

Reggae Monday!

Los Aggrotones — Reggae Rapado

Pat Kelly — Workman Song

Peter Tosh — Pick Myself Up

The Starlites — Some A Weh A Bawl

***

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

zip

Aside

Get the CD here! The  one and only Mr. Jimmy Cliff has a brand new EP out. He does an amazing job covering The Clash’s Guns Of Brixton. But the true bomb on this EP is without d a doubt … Continue reading

A Bag O’ Toots and The Maytals

I couldn’t wait until tomorrow for my weekly Reggae fix. So, here we go with Toots and his Maytals; they always manage to get me out of the dumps …

Playlist:

Are You Mine

I Shall Be Free

Never You Change

Daddy

Schooldays

***

DivShare

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Playlist:

Bob Marley — Midnight Ravers

Ken Parker — Only Yesterday

Pluto — I Man Bitter

U-Roy — I Can’t Love Another

DivShare

LimeLinx

Zip

Reggae Monday!

Don’t Forget To Boogie On Reggae People!

Gregory Isaacs — Heartache

Derrick Morgan — Send A Little Rain

Turnell McGormack — Three Card Man

John Holt — Tree In The Meadow

***

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday

 

Wishing everyone a very happy Sunday. I, for my part, couldn’t be any happier — fall is here to stay; it’s raining, and the temperatures have dropped to a very pleasant level.

Playlist:

Alcatraz — Count Machuki

Dat — Hanley Banton

Fire Fire (Flames) –Flora Adams

Knowledge is Power — The Ethiopians

Enjoy

Limelinx

zip

Marcia Griffiths — Gypsy Man

Alright! This one is for us ladies, girls, women who still remember the time when the sparks were flying and ’em little devils were stirring inside us at the sight of a guy that caught our attention … I mean way, way back in the day, of course.

The queen of Reggae, Marcia Griffiths, is one of my all time favorite female singers. I just like her straightforward way of delivery; no over-singing, no over-dramatizing, no girly oohs and such — but all woman. Listen to her telling the story. She’s painting such a convincing picture of what is happening in front of her, you almost feel like watching the scene yourself.

Here’s Marcia’s take on the Curtis Mayfield classic Gypsy Woman, the song he  composed for the Impressions in 1964.

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday — Feelin’ It

Playlist:

The Slickers — Nana

Tommy McCook — The Saint (The Saints Go Marching In)

Roy Richards — Reggae Monica

The Bleechers — You Gonna Feel It

Lester Sterling — Reggae In The Wind

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday at SOTS: Love On

After the wildfire scare, that old Reggae motto “Love Life” has a new meaning to me. So, your old Raggedy loves life even a little more than before: love on, groove on, dream on, reggae on …

Playlist:

The Chosen Few — Do Your Thing

The Upsetters — Dreamland

Kingstonians — Easy Ride Reggae

Slim Smith — Stand Up And Fight

Dennis Brown — Go Now

***

Enjoy! (DivShare down)

LimeLinx

zip

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Have a very happy Reggae Sunday everybody!

Playlist

Biafra — The Crystalites

Coconut Water — Desmond Dekker and The Aces

Devil’s Lead Soup — The Rudies

Cool Operator — Pat Kelly

Lock Love Away — The Melodians

Enjoy

LimLinx

zip

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Playlist:

The Bleechers — Ease Up

The Slickers — Nana

The Versatiles — Children Get Ready

Soulmates — Them A Laugh And A Kiki

Enjoy!

Limelinx

This is an interesting documentary about Skinhead Reggae.

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Playlist
Rough and Tough In The Ghetto — Jackie Bernard
Play Me — Marcia Griffiths feat. Lloyd Charmers
Road Block — Byron Lee and The Dragonaires

Reggae Sunday at SOTS: The Gladiators — Boy In Long Pants parts 1 and 2



Reggae Sunday at SOTS: Dennis Brown Special

Playlist

Intro
Lips of Wine
Rock With Me Baby
Going To A Ball
Money In My Pocket
Outro
To see the post that inspired today’s special, please go to Distinctly Jamaican Sounds 

A Bag O’ Reggae

Happy Reggae Sunday!

Playlist:

What A Fire  — The Ethopians

Crying Over You  — The Heptones

Please Stop Your Crying — Larry Marshall and The Cables

Life — Laurel Aitken

LimeLinx

Enjoy!

FileFactory

Raggedy’s Pool Party (Day Three): Let It Be Reggae!

Playlist:

It’s My Delight — The Melodians

Bangerang — Stranger Cole and Lester Sterling

Check Him Out — The Bleechers

Dynamic Pressure — Music Specialists

He’ll Have To Go — David Isaacs

My Lonely World — Desmond Dekker

Here Again — Johnny Nash

And I Love Her — Bob Marley and The Wailers

Soulful — The Upsetters

Some Sweet Day — Zap Pow

It’s Been A Long, Long Time — Eric “Monty” Morris

So Long Baby — The Marvels

Moonlight Lover — Joya Landis

Peace and Love — Justin Hinds and The Dominoes

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

FileFactory

Reggae Sunday!

Happy Reggae Sunday to you all!

Im and David — Midnight Soul

Stranger and Patsy — Down By The Trainline

The Upsetters — Man From MI5

Reggae on!

LimeLinx

Lovers Rock Special

Okay people. I need some cool Reggae to make me forget the crazy heat. It has to be easy, easy, easy on both body and mind …

***

Playlist:

Artibella — Ken Boothe

Too Long In The Wind — Ken Boothe

All The Love In The World — Eddie Lovette

Sail On — Eddie Lovette

Write Her A Letter — John Holt

Just Out Of Reach  — John Holt

***

Yay! Feeling so much better … Reggae on! Now, where’s my Margarita?

Limelinx

FileFactory

Reggae Sunday with Desmond Dekker (July 16, 1941 – May 25, 2006)

On a wonderful Texan Sunday like this, all I need to be completely happy is some strong coffee, brewed from fresh French roast beans, hot toast with an overdose of almond butter and black cherry marmalade … and a round of Reggae music.


Playlist:

Where Did It Go ( First Time For A Long Time)

It Was Only A Dream  (The Writing Of The Wall)

My Precious Love (The Writing …)

Too Much Too Soon (The Writing …)

Intensified (Intensified)

You’ve Got Your Troubles (Action)

The sweetest Reggae voice that ever was!

… and because I love this live clip of Israelites, I’ll post it too.

 Reggae On!

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday!

Better Late … I’m trying to stay on track with my posts, so in between spending quality time with hubby — who’s not working or traveling for a change — and cooking and relaxing, I finish the posts that have been waiting for completion …

Okay, Reggae Sunday at S.O.T.S this Memorial Day weekend is of course about peace because peace is the only way to stop wars and their senseless trademark activities: dying and destroying.

Playlist:

Peace and Love — Justin Hinds & The Dominoes

Peace, Perfect Peace — Toots and The Maytals

Peace, Perfect Peace — Laurel Aitken

Peace and Love — Greyhound

Stop The War Now — Lloyd Parks

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday!

Joe Gibbs and The Professionals — Bounty Hunter

Black Man Kingdom Comes — The Melodians

Llans Thewell and his Celestials — Choo Choo Ska

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

FileFactory

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Dandy Livingstone — Every Day Gets A Little Bit Sweeter

Derrick Harriott  — Tang Tang Festival Song

Desmond Dekker — Trample

The Eagles — Don’t Look Back

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Playlist:

Alton Ellis — Dance Crasher

Bob Marley — Let Him Go

Max Romeo — Mellow Mood

Count Prince Miller — Bewildered

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

FileFactory

Tyrone Taylor — Hurt Me

Reggae on Sunday makes grey skies go away

Yeah, yeah … I know. This is not very original, but I love Piece Of  My Heart in any way it happens to be played, copied or whatever else.

Posted by Raggedy at 3/20/2011 05:36:00 PM 0 comments  

Reggae Sunday at S.O.T.S.

Laurel Aitken, The Godfather of Ska, exclusively.
Who Sey
Jamboree
Something’s Gotta Be Wrong
Also: for a great ReggaeMix (“anti-Valentine’s”) take a look at Distinctly Jamaican Sounds

Posted by Raggedy at 2/27/2011 12:01:00 AM 0 comments  

>Reggae Sunday at S.O.T.S

>

Acting Strange — David Isaacs (More David Isaacs here.)
Babe and Suckling —  The Gladiators
Broadway Jungle — Toots and The Maytals
Kinky Griner – Prince Buster 
Carolina — Prince Buster

>Reggae Sunday!

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A bagful of Reggae to  make the gloomiest mood go away!
Comes and Goes — The Melodians
Thunderball — The Upsetters
So Long Baby — The Marvels 

>Reggae Sunday

>

Playlist:
Love And Affection — Bob Marley and The Wailers (Birth of a Legend)
We Need Love — Johnny Osbourne
Love is a Treasure — Freddie McKay

>Sydney Rodgers — Child From A Broken Home / Don’t Throw Stones / Raggy Raggy Clothes

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Reggae on a Monday is quite as good as Reggae on a Sunday. Isn’t it? 

 Sidney Rodgers (Miracle Worker, 1974):
Child From A Broken Home
Don’t Throw Stones
Raggy Raggy Clothes 

>Reggae Reggae Reggae

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Playlist

Coming In From The Cold — Bob Marley (Fuer meine Freunde in der deutschen Kaelte!)
Love At First Sight — Brentford Rd. Allstars (For the grown-ups in our midst!)
My Reward — Desmond Dekker (For all of us!)

>Happy Reggae Sunday!

>



Playlist

Funny Man — Freedom Singers (Studio One)
Mun Dun Bu — Im and David (Freedom Sound, Studio One)
They Don’t Know — Jimmy London (A Little Love)
Pee Pee Cluck Cluck (a.k.a Uncle Joe ) — The Melodians
Bla Bla Bla — Toots and The Mayatls

Enjoy!
limelinx

FileFactory

>I-Yi — H.A.W.K

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After a week of house-cleaning and other useless, but strenuous, activities, I am in desperate need for some music that keeps me moving.

>Reggae Sunday Again!

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Playlist
Don’t Trouble Trouble — The Maytals
Moon Hop — Sound Dimension
Tighten Up — Untouchables
Everybody Needs Love — Lloyd Charmers

>Reggae Sunday at SOTS

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The Rulers – Wrong ‘Em Boyo
John Holt  — I Want You Closer
The Gladiators — Good Good Loving
Desmond Dekker — Father Noak 
Duke Reid — Psychedelic Reggae

Reggae sunday At SOTS



SOTS Sundays belong to Reggae

Playlist
Ernie Freeman — Live It Up
The Skatalites — Latin Goes Ska
Roy Bennett — I Dangerous
Dave Barker — Loneliness

Enjoy!
LimeLinx

 

 

Reggae Sunday!

Are You Ready? Are You Ready?

Here comes another Reggae Sunday at SOTS

Playlist

Soulful — Big L
Crystal Ball — Peter Tosh
My Girl — Lee Perry/Upsetters

 

 

Additional Serving — 70’s Greats live

Yesterday, I was listening to so much Philly Sound I woke up with kind of a hangover this morning … At least that’s how it felt. So, I eased the pain with another dose of TSOP — and here is a clip I found while I was rummaging YouTube for more and more and more  of my favorite sound.



Reggae Sunday!

What a gorgeous Sunday! Sunshine, blue skies again … and I am in da mood for some Reggae. Let the good times rule!

 

 

Hugh Malcolm — Good Time Rock

The Kingstonians — Hold Down

Karl “Cannonball” Bryan and The Harry J Allstars — Soul Special

(All titles are from Reggae Pressure — Boss sounds 1969-1970)

 

Enjoy!

FileFactory

 

Pieces of my Past

Posted by Gua

I have been ripping my old albums and have rediscovered one of my favorite songs. Gil-Scott Heron was really one of the pioneers of what we call “rap” since a lot of people know him from the classic ” The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”.
Gil was also an accomplished musician and often collaborated with pianist “Brian Jackson”. Together they made some classic Jazz/blues/R&B music. This is one of my favs.
Take a listen to the melancholy baritone(Raggedy, I’m still on the Baritone bandwagon) of Gil-Scott and Brian (on the keyboard) as they capture frustrations of a man that could clearly be here and now. This was released 1971.

If you would like to listen on your computer here 

On a side note John legend’s voice reminds me of Gil-Scott, what do you think?

Reggae Sunday at SOTS

 

Playlist

Sugar Minott — Change Your Ways
The Crystalites — Stop That Man
Desmond Dekker — Go And Tell My People
Llans and his Celestials — Choo Choo Ska

Enjoy!

(link will take you to the original blog)

FileFactory

 

 

Reggae Sunday

Happy Sunday to everyone!

Playlist


Termites — Love Up Kiss Up

Count Matchuki — Movement

Lloyd Charmers — Follow This Sound

Max Romeo — Nice Time

Listen

D/l MediaFire

FileFactory

 

The Upsetters — Hard To Handle

 

Most of the Reggae re-makes of the great soul tunes usually sound quite unimaginative — but I find this cover ofHard To Handle refreshing. The lead singer on this track is Carl Dawkins, which at first I thought was not true. I couldn’t remember having ever heard him as raspy as in this song. But when I re-listened to some of his other songs, I noticed that he used a bit of this raspiness in other songs, too. Not quite as intensely, though as in Hard To Handle. He probably had Big O. in mind when he covered this song.

 

 

AudioBlog#12_ReggaeForAKick

It seems I can’t get my audioblogs finished in time to be posted every Friday  … So, I am late again. But this one is right on time for a Reggae Sunday!


Playlist:

Tease Me — Chaka Demus

This Is Thunder — The Dingle Bros. and Baba Brooks Band

Little Did You Know –The Techniques

Don De Lion — Don Drummond

Don’t Fool Young Girls — The Gladiators

Peggy — Toots and The Maytals

Express Yourself — Hopeton Lewis

Reggae In Your Baggy


Let’s Hear some Tuesday Reggae!



1. Too Much Confusion — Winston Jarrett
2.Wanted Man — Dennis Green
Mr.Lee (version) — Lloydy Slim and The Agrovators

Go To FileFactory.com

>Reggae Sunday!

>

Reggae Sunday!

Well it’s more like a Ska Sunday! 

Eric “Monty” Morris, Kingstonians, Toots and The Maytals

Reggae Sunday !

By The Sea

Easy Ride Reggae

Bam Bam

Nicky Thomas — New Morning

Let’s start the new week with a Reggae song by Nicky Thomas.


Here’s a short bio of the artist:

Nicky Thomas was born Cecil Nicholas Thomas in Portland, Jamaica, in 1949. His first hit in the islands was “Run Nigel Run,” produced by Derrick Harriot in 1969, but Thomas’ most successful songs were recorded with producer Joe Gibbs, including the wonderful “Love of the Common People,” which rode its reggae-pop sound into the U.K. Top Ten in 1970. Following a tour of Britain in support of the single that same year, Thomas decided to stay, and he continued to release his brand of pop-infused reggae from the U.K. until his death in 1990. Sort of a poor man’s Jimmy Cliff, Thomas produced a small but infectious body of work, and he deserves to be remembered on the strength of “Love of the Common People” alone, as well as for songs like “BBC,” a harsh criticism of Radio 1‘s treatment of Jamaican reggae artists. ~ Steve Leggett, Rovi

Enjoy!

Reggae Sunday!

Happy Summer Sundays need to be celebrated with some Reggae tunes!

Baby I’ve Been Missing You – Bunny Maloney

Black Coffee — Tommy McCook

I Man Bitter — Pluto Shervington

Zap Pow — This Is Reggae Music, Lottery Spin

Jeez, I haven’t posted a Reggae tune in a long while! I think I am getting a bit negligent … To make up for my deviant behavior, I’ll post some excellent Reggae Jazz from Jamaica.

Zap Pow was founded in 1970 by David Madden, the renowned trumpet player. Originally, the group  was meant to be an instrumental ensemble, but — on and off — included singers, too. Their biggest hit was This Is Reggae Music.

Today’s track is from the album Reggae Horn (1969 – 83) Early David Madden.

Enjoy!

Honey Boy — Jamaica, At The Dark End Of The Street

Reggae Saturday — Lovers Rock Reggae!

Honey Boy is definitely singing about paradise: sunshine all year long, sweet fruits to eat, fun, sea shore … That’s how he remembers Jamaica. It must be difficult to leave such a place. But if it were really the paradise he’s singing about, he probably would have stayed and not moved to the UK which does not possess such paradisiac characteristics.

Humans have a tendency to remember exactly those things they liked most — but rarely those that have driven them away from their countries. Having left my home country about 16 years ago — not out of necessity, though — I do understand very well what tricks the mind can play on a person who is remembering “home”.

The other title I added just because Dark End of The Street is an old love of mine, and I can’t get enough of the song’s different versions. I never knew there was a reggae version of it until I found this one.

Honey Boy’s real name is Keith Williams, and his birth year is believed to be 1955. He left Jamaica in the 60’s and ended up in London where he sang background for Laurel Aitken.  In 1973 he released his first album This Is Honey Boy. In the mid seventies Honey Boy became a major figure in the lovers rock genre which was the domain of such early Reggae artists as John Holt, Ken Boothe and Johnny Nash. Lovers Rock mainly consisted of reggaefied well-know love songs.

This is a nice and clean recording of Dark End Of The Street by Honey Boy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bf6PlMCuanA

Jamaica (from Reggae in You Jeggae, British Reggae 1968 – 1972))

Dark End Of The Street

A Bag O’ Reggae

Here Comes Another Reggae Sunday!

Joe Gibbs and The Professionals — The Great Escape

David Madden — Rock Till Kingdom Come

Alan Barry — Down We Go

Justin Hinds and The Dominoes — Come Bail Me,

Reggae Sunday Reggae Sunday Reggae Sunday

Check this album out! I do like it a lot.

Come Bail Me

>Johnny Nash — The Very First Time

>Johnny Nash’s natural tenor is the kind of voice that thrills me with its clear, clean high pitch that is just soft enough to avoid any sharp edges. I think the song I am posting today was exactly the kind of material he should have been singing more often. Okay, his voice may be reminiscent of Desmond Dekker’s who became a Reggae legend despite his way too sweet voice for that genre. But Johnny’s voice lacks something — I can’t quite figure out what it is — that snuggly fits the Reggae mold, so to speak. Maybe it’s only the missing accent?
The Very First Time is a beautiful Pop/Soul/Reggae piece that seems to be tailor-made for Johnny’s singing style and voice.
I love the romantic aura of the song, created by the subtle acoustic guitar and electric piano sounds.
Is this a girl thing? What do the guys say?

The Very First Time (Celebrate Life, 1974)

>Prince Buster — A Change Is Gonna Come

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Give me some Reggae! Please!
… and Prince Buster it will be

>Beres Hammond –Oh, Take Me Girl

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‘kay! Dim the lights please — it’s softy time. Ask your baby for a dance — and then lose yourself in this sweet melody.
The song can be found on Hammond’s 1994 release Soul Reggae. I like the entire album; everything from the instrumentation and the sweet harmonies is 70’sthrough and through. Beres Hammond’s work is definitely worth checking out. Very expressive soulful voice, too!

>Carl Bradney — Slipping Into Darkness

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Reggae Sunday!

Slipping Into Darkness, (Soul From Jamtown, Darker Than Blue)

>Byron Lee — In The Mood, Derrick Harriot — Laugh It Off, Desmond Dekker — First Time For A Long Time,

>

Reggae Sunday!
In The Mood, Byron Lee and The Dragonaires (Reggae Round The World)
Laugh It Off, Derrick Harriott (Trojan Reggae Brothers)
First Time For A Long Time, Desmond Dekker, (First Time For A Long Time)

>Jackie Mittoo — Drum Song, El Bang Bang

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Time for another REGGAE Sunday at S.O.T.S
Here comes the champion on the keyboard — Jackie Mittoo. He was a founding member of the legendary Skatalites, and he left his mark on music history by influencing many a young musician with his work at the famous Studio One.
Jackie was born in Browns Town, Jamaica March 3, 1948. He died of cancer in 1990.




Biography by Jason Ankeny

Keyboard virtuoso Jackie Mittoo was among the true legends of reggae — a founding member of the Skatalites and an extraordinarily prolific songwriter, he was perhaps most influential as a mentor to countless younger performers, primarily through his work as the musical director at the famed Studio One. Born Donat Roy Mittoo in Browns Town, Jamaica on March 3, 1948, he began playing keyboards at the age of four, and was rarely far from a piano through his teen years, performing professionally in groups including the Vagabonds and the Vikings. He frequently skipped school to play with the house band at nearby Federal Studios, and it was there that he met producer Coxsone Dodd, who recruited Mittoo for recording sessions when the scheduled pianist failed to appear on time. While attending Kingston College, he began jamming with fellow studentAugustus Pablo, and they eventually formed a trio — the Jackie Mitree — which performed his original compositions.

By 1962, Mittoo was earning attention across the island for his work in the band the Sheiks, one of Jamaica’s most sought-after club attractions. Despite rechristening themselves the Cavaliers Orchestra, their popularity continued to soar without missing a beat. When Dodd opened Studio One in Kingston in 1963, he tapped Mittoo to serve as musical director; in the years to follow he played on virtually every disc the studio produced, arranging much of the material and helping develop new songs until they were sufficiently polished to meet standards. By the early months of 1964, he set about forming a new band with Studio One session regulars Tommy McCookLloyd Brevette and Lester Sterling, as well as the Cavaliers’Lloyd Knibb and Johnny Moore. Dubbing themselves the Skatalites, they were to become the quintessential ska band of the period; also featuring the legendary trombonist Don Drummond, the group lasted just 14 months — from June 1964 to August 1965 — but their influence on music worldwide remains incalculable.

After the Skatalites split, Mittoo began a solo career, scoring a major hit with his rendition of the Heptones “Fatty Fatty.” The instrumental smash “Ram Jam” followed in 1967, and resulted in a series of instrumental LPs, among them In LondonEvening TimeKeep On DancingNow and Macka Fat. At the same time, Mittoo continued his relentless pace at Studio One — according to the terms of his basic arrangment with Dodd, he received payment upon delivering five new rhythms a week, which over the years resulted in literally thousands of compositions which he both produced and arranged. Among Mittoo’s greatest contributions of the mid-to-late 1960s were “Darker Shade of Black” (the basis for Frankie Paul’s “Pass the Tu Sheng Peng”), Freddie McGregor’s “Bobby Babylon,” Alton Ellis’ “I’m Still in Love with You,” the Cables’ rock steady anthem “Baby Why” and “Feel Like Jumping,” Marcia Griffiths’ first hit. In 1970, his “Peanie Wallie” was also versioned by the Wailers, becoming the hit “Duppy Conqueror.”

Mittoo relocated from Jamaica to Toronto, Ontario in 1968, one of many reggae performers who found a home among the clubs lining the city’s Yonge Street area. He returned to Kingston regularly, however, and was closely aligned with Dodd and Studio One throughout the decades to follow. In Toronto, Mittoo also accepted a day job working for the Canadian Talent Library, an organization which worked to ensure that a sufficient amount of Canadian music was broadcast over national radio airwaves. By 1972, he had lived there for four years, and as such his work now qualified as “Canadian content,” so for the CTL he recorded the album Reggae Magic, which launched the hit ‘Wish Bone.” During the mid-1970s, Mittoo also traveled to England to record a series of LPs with Bunny Lee; during the next decade, he worked regularly with Sugar Minott as well. In 1989, Mittoo joined the reunited Skatalites, but health problems soon forced him to bow out; he died of cancer on December 16, 1990.                

Drum Song 
El Bang Bang

>Raggedy Loves Reggae! David Isaacs Special

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David Isaacs is one of the sweet-soft-voiced Reggae singers reminiscent of Desmond Dekker. (I just love their sound.) David worked with the famous Lee Scratch Perry during the 60’s and 70’s.
His version of Stevie Wonder’s A Place In The Sun is considered one of the recordings that “established Trojan Records as major force in Reggae.” (Wiki) 
The second track, Linger A While, is a personal favorite of mine, and you’ve got to love the sax on Rather Be Lonely.
The last track, True Love, I’ve added just for the fun of it … There’s never too much Reggae on my blog.

But here at SOTS nobody will ever be lonely — we’re all just happy people who love our kind of music.

>The Ethiopians — Train To Skaville, The Whip

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>Shark Wilson & The Basement Heaters

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>Matumbi — Law of the Land

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Some very soulful Reggae from Matumbi, a group from the UK.
Law of the Land is my favorite Tempts song of the post David Ruffin era. I was quite surprised to hear such a good Reggae cover of it. Law of The Land actually was the song that made me curious about the music of the Temptations and had me look into their repertoire. I’ve heard Matumbi for the first time today, and I know I will be looking for more material by this group with such a unique style.

Matumbi is one of the early British Reggae bands that never managed to break into the US market. They formed in 1972 in London. At that time Jamaican roots Reggae was on its way to the top. The Reggae Matumbi played was tailored to the taste of the British scene emphasizing the softer more soulful style laced with a touch of Pop. They are considered pioneers who prepared the British audience for the arrival of lots of new Reggae groups.

Have a reggaeful Monday you all!

>Joya Landis — Moonlight Lover, Angel Of The Morning, When The Lights Are Low.

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You just have to love Joya. The first song I ever heard by her was “When The Lights Are Low.” I could listen to that song all day long without ever tiring of it. Her voice is so pleasantly different from what one gets to hear nowadays: it is sexy without sounding cheap, very feminine yet not sweet. I don’t know why I haven’t posted her earlier.

But here she is!

American based singer Joya Landis recorded an early reggae version of Angel of the morning in 1968. The Jamaican single was on the Treasure Isle label. The UK single (on Trojan TR 622) had Love Letters by Phyllis Dillon & Alton Ellis on the b-side. It also appeared on the compilation album Soul Of Jamaica a.k.a. Come Rock With Me In Jamaica, 1968 and on the Trojan compilation album Tighten Up, Volume 1, 1968. It was produced by Arthur Reid.

>Dave Barker — Love Me Baby

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Reggae Monday!


My new kitchen still hasn’t been completely installed yet, and I will have to put up with a few more days of hammering, drilling, sawing etc.,  so I’ll post another track w/o much talk again.

This is from Dave Barker’s Prisoner of Love album

Love Me Baby

>Winston Jarrett — Survival Is The Game

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>"You’ll Lose A Good Thing" Reggae version by Audrey Hall

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Hall began her career singing with Dandy Livingstone in the duo Dandy & Audrey.[1] They recorded the song “Morning Side of the Mountain” in 1969, the success of which led to an album of the same name.[1] They released a second album on the Trojan label, I Need You. Livingstone also produced Hall’s early solo recordings for his Downtown label.[2] Hall worked as a backing singer through much of the 1970s and early 1980s alongside her sister Pam, including on Jimmy Cliff’s Give The People What They Want, and Peter Tosh’s Mama Africa,[3] but she made a comeback as a solo artist in 1985 with “One Dance Just Won’t Do”, an answer record to Beres Hammond’s “What One Dance Can Do”, produced by Donovan Germain, which took her into the UK top 20.[4] This was followed up by “Smile” in 1986, which repeated her chart success and gave her her biggest hit, and “The Best Thing For Me”. In 1986, she returned to recording duets, with “Heart Made of Stone” and the album Dynamic Duo, recorded with former Paragon Don Evans.[1] She continued to work with Germain, recording for his Germain and Penthouse labels, and released the album Reggae Zones in 2001.  (Wikipedia)

>Reggae Wednesday!

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Hey y’all! I just wanted to let you know that I’m having a reggaeful Wednesday today. Temperature is in the 100’s (38 C) and no end of the heat in sight. What could be more refreshing than some ol’ reggae?

So, here’s the playlist:

Jimmy Cliff — My Ancestors
Jimmy Cliff — Sufferin’ In The Land
Third World — 96 Degrees In The Shade
John Holt — What You Gonna Do
Roland Alphonso — Song For My Father

>Reggae Sunday!

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Let’s All Reggae!

Dirty Streets — The Paragons
Bla Bla Bla — Toots & The Maytals
Peace — I-Roy
Theme From Shaft — The Chosen Few