Category Archives: Uncategorized

In Memory of Birgit

Rest in peace

June 14, 1951 – June 14, 2006

This Gift Of Life

***

After great pain a formal feeling comes–
The nerves sit ceremonious like tombs;
The stiff Heart questions–was it He that bore?
And yesterday–or centuries before?

The feet, mechanical, go round
A wooden way
Of ground, or air, or ought,
Regardless grown,
A quartz contentment, like a stone.

This is the hour of lead
Remembered if outlived,
As freezing persons recollect the snow–
First chill, then stupor, then the letting go.

(Emily Dickinson)

HELP!

Does anyone know:

– who sang: I Took A Dip In The Pool of Love?

– the title and artist of this song:  listen

Happy Easter To All Of You!

The Brooklyn Allstars — No Cross, No Crown

Enjoy!

Bill Brandon — I Am Free Of Your Love

 

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Aside

As much as I loved the old theme, it had to go. The font was too small and there were no different post formats available. Well, here we go with a new look again.

Charles Farren — A Girl Like You

Darned, the week is almost over, and I didn’t make time to post … It’s a shame because I consider every week the compressed version of my life; and it’s just wrong to let busyness keep you from doing what you love most.

Today’s song is one of those tunes that got me hooked the first time ever I heard it. Charles Farren delivers a truly great soul blues ballad. His voice, gritty and intense ranges from baritone through falsetto — with adorable ease. And the music! Just listen to this arrangement.

 Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Have a very happy Friday everyone!

Don’t Forget To Tune In …

to another one of Barry Fowden’s Vintage Soul Radio shows tomorrow Oct. 16, 2011

More info: here.

Joe Tex — Skinny Legs live in Spain 1968 (clip)

So, this is where JB got his moves from. In this clip, Joe Tex definitely shows that he knew how to moooooooove … This is simply fascinating.

Does anyone know this song?

 Unknown song (LimeLinx)

DivShare

Sorry,

I am not really in the mood for blogging. You may have heard about the wildfires in Texas. Well, we just happen to live right in an area where it’s burning. Today we had packed our suitcases, put them into the trunks of our cars — ready to leave our homes to whatever might be happening to them. Thank goodness, the wind blew the fire away from our section of the town.

I don’t have the words to describe the feelings I had. I knew that the minute we had to evacuate, we would leave our home and everything that makes a house a home, to a unknown fate.

Fire is horror.

As soon as things have calmed down, I will get back to regular blogging.

Thanks for understanding.

Yours ol’ Raggedy.

Soundtracks From The Harder They Come

Hubby and I were in a nostalgic mood last night, and we ended up watching The Harder They Come again. What a great movie — after all, the message still seems to be as urgent as 40 years ago.

So here comes a tribute to the Reggae man, Jimmy Cliff. I agree 100% “… I’d rather be a free (wo)man in my grave/ Than living as a puppet or a slave.”

The Harder They Come
Jimmy Cliff

Well, they tell me of a pie up in the sky
Waiting for me when I die
But between the day you’re born and when you die
You know, they never seem to hear even your cry

Chorus:
So as sure as the sun will shine
I’m gonna get my share now what is mine
And then the harder they come
The harder they fall
One and all
The harder they come
The harder they fall
One and all

And the oppressors are trying to track me down
They’re trying to drive me underground
And they think that they have got the battle won
I say, forgive them Lord, they know not what they’ve done

Chorus

And I keep on fighting for the things I want
Though I know that when you’re dead you can’t
But I’d rather be a free man in my grave
Than living as a puppet or a slave

Enjoy

LimeLinx

An Aside: Jury Duty/DWI

Yesterday, I was downtown for jury selection. The case to be tried was a DWI case. The defendant already had two prior convictions for the same offense. Of course, I was not eager to follow the summons for jury duty — it’s so inconvenient. On the other hand, trial by jury is a right we who live in a free country must consider sacred.  But aren’t there enough others who can do it?

So, when I was getting up at six in the morning (considerably earlier than usual), putting on my make up, and getting dressed, my brain was working hard trying to figure out what to say that would disqualify me as a juror. Alas, I came up with some statements that wouldn’t please both the prosecution and the defense.

But things turned out to be completely different than I had expected.

It was the  second time I’d been part of the U.S. justice system. The first time, I was released right after the lunch break. This time I had the opportunity to experience the entire procedure of jury selection. And what can I say? I consider myself blessed to live in a country with a justice system geared at being as fair as possible to all parties involved. After all, it could happen to each and everyone of us. Chances are that we ourselves might end up in court, for whatever reason. I could be in the hot seat of the defendant someday or you might be the victim of a crime, fighting for your rights.

To make a long story short: I was at the Bexar County Justice Center from 7:30 am to 6:30 pm. But I must say that these hours were well spent. One pleasant side effect of the long stay in the jury selection room was that I’ve met some very nice fellow Texans; we had a great time just talking.

The most valuable experience, however, was watching both the prosecution and the defense pick their candidates. In this case, I would say that the prosecution appeared to be the least manipulative party involved while the defense attorney was working a little too hard to convince us of the defendant’s innocence before the trial had  even started. At some point during this procedure, I even hoped I could serve on this jury — believe it or not.

There was also an unexpected, heart-wrenching side to this entire experience which touched me deep inside and eventually inspired me to write this post. I was shocked when I heard how many lives of potential jurors had been affected by alcoholism or the indiscriminate use of alcohol: fatal accidents; crippled daughters, sons, fathers; battered wives, abused children – so much pain caused by a drug most of us still consider relatively  harmless. After each and everyone of those whose lives had forever been changed  by this drug had made their statements, my stomach felt like lead.

All in all, I don’t consider the hours spent at the Justice Center wasted time any longer. I entered the building, passing through the metal detector, viewing jury duty as a bother. I left the building in the evening through the back door (the main entrance was already locked) considering myself lucky to live in a country with a justice system aiming to be fair to both the victim and the accused. Most of all, though, I feel so lucky that my live has not been touched by the tragedies so many of the people in the same room with me did describe.

So, I use this blog today to ask all of you to support our justice system by not avoiding jury duty; if you care for justice — really care — not only talk loud about injustice and corruption, go and be part of the system. You as a juror make all the difference!

Second: please, please do not drive, if you have consumed alcohol. You might become the person who destroyed a beautiful, healthy child’s life by crippling her. You might become the one responsible for taking away a caring parent from his children. You might be the one to shame your own children and family for having done what you have done.

Yours all

ol’ Raggedy

Remembering Papa

Today my father would have turned 90. My memories of him are fond, and they bring an odd combination of a smile and a grin on my face.

There was that time during my teenage years when we were sparring partners most of the time; I guess that’s when I’ve learned how to stand my ground. (You know, that German perseverance trait thing …)

And there were the times we fought side by side; I guess that’s when I’ve learned that fathers are “just people” too …

I am not Madonna’s biggest fan, but Papa Don’t Preach could have been my very own words.

Lazy Friday: James Carr — You’ve Got My Mind Messed Up (vid.)

True soul doesn’t come any better than this!

Aside

… tune in on Sunday, June 26th, 2011: another one of Barry Fowden’s Vintage Soul Radio shows. More info here.

In Memory Of My Sister Birgit (June 14, 1951 – June 14, 2006)

Rest in peace.

And here’s your candle.

I know she would have had a lavish party had she lived to turn 60. And I remember so very well what fun it was to watch her practicing how to do the twist in our living room. She sure could do the twist … So, instead of  sad songs, I’ll post something that conjures up images of the happy days we enjoyed together.

DivShare

LimeLinx

Playlist:

Do You Love Me  — The Contours

The Twist — Chubby Checker

Mashed Potatoes — Dee Dee Sharp

Let’s Twist Again — Chubby Checker

C and The Shells — On Your Way Home

Today’s track comes from The Swamp Dogg Anthology 1968 -78 (Kent Records, UK, 2008) which is a great compilation of early compositions by “Swamp Dogg” Jerry Williams Jr. 

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Here’s more from and about C & The Shells

David Ruffin — Just Let Me Hold You For One Night / My Love Is Growing Stronger

Here’s my birthday present to myself. 

Enjoy! (DivShare not working)

Lime Linx


Aside

R.I.P  “My” David Ruffin Today marks the 20. anniversary of David Ruffin’s death.  “Without you The Morning sun looks blue” Enyoy!

Frederick Knight — If You Love Your Baby

You’ll find the album here.

How about some middle of the week disco tune? Well, here comes one that has not been played ad nauseam.

The track is from Let The Sunshine In (Juana, 1978). If you like your music with a dash of Disco, this album will not disappoint you.

Frederick Knight was born August 15, 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama. The singer, songwriter and producer began his recording career with Mercury and Capitol. In 1972 he joined STAX Records and hit the UK single charts with his best known song I’ve Been Lonely For So Long. Because this single should be his one and only hit, he’s known as one of the many one-hit-wonders. In 1975 he scored another hit with Betcha Didn’t Know That whose single version has become one of my all time favorites. (Thanks Soultaker!) There’s a long, somewhat slower, smoother version of the song on his 1987 Knight Kap album which isn’t bad at all, yet it lacks the immediacy of the single version, in my opinion.

After STAX had folded, he founded his own label Juana Records, continuing to write and produce. In 1979, Anita Ward with Ring My Bell, written by Frederick Knight, scored a # 1 hit on the UK single charts.

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Betcha Didn’t Know That


Say No!

No music today. Because those to whom the day is dedicated cannot hear it. Instead, I post another poem by a soldier of WWII.

 

Then There’s Only One Choice!

Dann Gibt Es Nur Eins!

By Wolfgang Borchert

English translation: William T. Hathaway

[ed. The original German text is appended to the English translation.]

(Swans – November 19, 2007)

You. Man at the machine in the factory. When they tell you tomorrow to stop making pots and pans and instead make helmets and machine guns, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Woman in the store, woman in the office. When they tell you tomorrow to fill grenades and mount telescopic sights on sniper rifles, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Factory owner. When they tell you tomorrow to make gunpowder instead of baby powder, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Researcher in the laboratory. When they tell you tomorrow to invent new ways to kill people, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Songwriter in your studio. When they tell you tomorrow not to sing love songs but hate songs, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Doctor in the clinic. When they tell you tomorrow to declare soldiers fit for combat, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Minister in the pulpit. When they tell you tomorrow to bless murder and sanctify war, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Captain of the freighter. When they tell you tomorrow to ship cannons and tanks instead of wheat, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Pilot of the plane. When they tell you tomorrow to drop bombs on cities, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Tailor in your shop. When they tell you tomorrow to make uniforms, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Judge in robes. When they tell you tomorrow to serve on a court-martial, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Railroad worker. When they tell you tomorrow to give the signal to send the troop and munitions trains, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Man in the country, man in the city. When they try to recruit you into the military, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO!

You. Mother in Normandy, mother in the Ukraine, you, mother in San Francisco and London, you, on the Yellow River and the Mississippi River, you, mother in Naples and Hamburg and Cairo and Oslo — mothers of all continents, mothers of the world, when they tell you tomorrow to raise children to be nurses for field hospitals and soldiers for new battles, then there’s only one choice:
Say NO! Mothers, say NO!

Because if you don’t say NO, if YOU don’t say no, mothers, then:

then:

In the noisy steamy dusty port cities the great ships will groan into silence and float like cadavers of drowned mammoths, slapping sluggishly against the lonely docks while algae, seaweed and mussels grow on the once roaring gleaming hulls that now lie decomposing in a watery cemetery stinking of squishy decayed fish.

the streetcars will become dull senseless glass-eyed beetles lying crudely dented and peeling next to skeletons of tangled wires and rusted tracks, behind dilapidated sheds with holes in the roofs, in desolate, cratered streets —

a mud-gray, porridge-thick, leaden stillness will roll over everything, devouring, growing spreading over schools and colleges and theaters, over sport fields and playgrounds, gruesome and greedy, unstoppable —

the juicy sun-ripened grapes will rot on their broken arbors, the green rice will wither on the parched earth, the potatoes will freeze in the abandoned fields, and the cows will raise their death-stiffened legs like upside-down milking stools towards heaven —

in the research centers new medicines discovered by great doctors will turn to fungus and mold —

in the kitchens, dining rooms and cellars, in the cold-storage lockers and warehouses, the last sacks of flour, the last jars of strawberries, pumpkins and cherry juice will spoil — the bread under the overturned tables and smashed plates will turn green, and the rancid butter will reek, the grain will lie limp as a fallen army in the fields next to rusting plows, and the smokestacks of the pounding factories will fall and smash and crumble to be covered with eternal grass —

then the last person, with lacerated bowels and polluted lungs, answerless and alone under a poisonous glaring sun and wobbling sky, will stagger back and forth between gaping mass graves and massive concrete idols of the deserted cities, the last person, scrawny, cursing, accusing, insane — and his terrible cry: WHY? will die unheard, fading across the plains, whispering through the shattered ruins, brushing against the rubble of churches and bunkers, sinking into pools of blood, the last answerless animal cry of the last human animal —

all this will happen, tomorrow, maybe tomorrow, maybe tonight, maybe tonight, if — if — if you don’t say NO.

Original German Poem

Du. Mann an der Maschine und Mann in der Werkstatt. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst keine Wasserrohre und keine Kochtöpfe mehr machen – sondern Stahlhelme und Maschinengewehre, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Mädchen hinterm Ladentisch und Mädchen im Büro. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst Granaten füllen und Zielfernrohre für Scharfschützengewehre montieren, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Besitzer der Fabrik. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst statt Puder und Kakao Schießpulver verkaufen, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Forscher im Laboratorium. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst einen neuen Tod erfinden gegen das alte Leben, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Dichter in deiner Stube. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst keine Liebeslieder, du sollst Haßlieder singen, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Arzt am Krankenbett. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst die Männer kriegstauglich schreiben, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Pfarrer auf der Kanzel. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst den Mord segnen und den Krieg heilig sprechen, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Kapitän auf dem Dampfer. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst keinen Weizen mehr fahren — sondern Kanonen und Panzer, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Pilot auf dem Flugfeld. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst Bomben und Phosphor über die Städte tragen, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Schneider auf deinem Brett. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst Uniformen zuschneiden, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Richter im Talar. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst zum Kriegsgericht gehen, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Mann auf dem Bahnhof. Wenn sie dir morgen befehlen, du sollst das Signal zur Abfahrt geben für den Munitionszug und für den Truppentransporter, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Mann auf dem Dorf und Mann in der Stadt. Wenn sie morgen kommen und dir den Gestellungsbefehl bringen, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sag NEIN!

Du. Mutter in der Normandie und Mutter in der Ukraine, du, Mutter in Frisko und London, du, am Hoangho und am Mississippi, du, Mutter in Neapel und Hamburg und Kairo und Oslo — Mütter in allen Erdteilen, Mütter in der Welt, wenn sie morgen befehlen, ihr sollt Kinder gebären, Krankenschwestern für Kriegslazarette und neue Soldaten für neue Schlachten, Mütter in der Welt, dann gibt es nur eins:
Sagt NEIN! Mütter, sagt NEIN!

Denn wenn ihr nicht NEIN sagt, wenn IHR nicht nein sagt, Mütter, dann:

dann:

In den lärmenden dampfdunstigen Hafenstädten werden die großen Schiffe stöhnend verstummen und wie titanische Mammutkadaver wasserleichig träge gegen die toten vereinsamten Kaimauern schwanken, algen—, tang— und muschelüberwest, den früher so schimmernden dröhnenden Leib, friedhöflich fischfaulig duftend, mürbe, siech, gestorben — die Straßenbahnen werden wie sinnlose glanzlose glasäugige Käfige blöde verbeult und abgeblättert neben den verwirrten Stahlskeletten der Drähte und Gleise liegen, hinter morschen dachdurchlöcherten Schuppen, in verlorenen kraterzerrissenen Straßen —

eine schlammgraue dickbreiige bleierne Stille wird sich heranwälzen, gefräßig, wachsend, wird anwachsen in den Schulen und Universitäten und Schauspielhäusern, auf Sport— und Kinderspielplätzen, grausig und gierig, unaufhaltsam —

der sonnige saftige Wein wird an den verfallenen Hängen verfaulen, der Reis wird in der verdorrten Erde vertrocknen, die Kartoffel wird auf den brachliegenden Äckern erfrieren und die Kühe werden ihre totsteifen Beine wie umgekippte Melkschemel in den Himmel strecken —

in den Instituten werden die genialen Erfindungen der großen Ärzte sauer werden, verrotten, pilzig verschimmeln —

in den Küchen, Kammern und Kellern, in den Kühlhäusern und Speichern werden die letzten Säcke Mehl, die letzten Gläser Erdbeeren, Kürbis und Kirschsaft verkommen — das Brot unter den umgestürzten Tischen und auf zersplitterten Tellern wird grün werden und die ausgelaufene Butter wird stinken wie Schmierseife, das Korn auf den Feldern wird neben verrosteten Pflügen hingesunken sein wie ein erschlagenes Heer und die qualmenden Ziegelschornsteine, die Essen und die Schlote der stampfenden Fabriken werden, vom ewigen Gras zugedeckt, zerbröckeln — zerbröckeln — zerbröckeln —

dann wird der letzte Mensch, mit zerfetzten Gedärmen und verpesteter Lunge, antwortlos und einsam unter der giftig glühenden Sonne und unter wankenden Gestirnen umherirren, einsam zwischen den unübersehbaren Massengräbern und den kalten Götzen der gigantischen betonklotzigen verödeten Städte, der letzte Mensch, dürr, wahnsinnig, lästernd, klagend — und seine furchtbare Klage: WARUM? wird ungehört in der Steppe verrinnen, durch die geborstenen Ruinen wehen, versickern im Schutt der Kirchen, gegen Hochbunker klatschen, in Blutlachen fallen, ungehört, antwortlos, letzter Tierschrei des letzten Tieres Mensch —

all dieses wird eintreffen, morgen, morgen vielleicht, vielleicht heute nacht schon, vielleicht heute nacht, wenn — wenn — wenn ihr nicht NEIN sagt.

· · · · · ·

Marvin L.Sims — What Can I Do

Happy New Week!

I’ll start the week with one of the many obscure artists who have released some notable recordings, but never achieved the success they deserved.

Todays title, What Can I Do, was written by Donnie Elbert and was one of the softer and sweeter titles the Northern Soul singer recorded in the 60’s. He released several 45’s between 1965 and 1972. After that he vanished from the scene to focus on his education and earn a degree in psychology.

In 1998, he finally returned with his debut album, Heart Talk, which was produced, arranged and written by Marvin himself. It was released by Rivertown records.

Enjoy!

LimeLinx

Now, everybody start your week on a mellow note.

Aside

Lloyd Knibb, the drummer of the Skatalites, died Friday at age 80. He had liver cancer. R.I.P Lloyd Here’s the obituary article.

Colwell-Winfield Blues Band — How Blue Can You Get (live)

BLUES ON THURSDAY

Now, I’ve read a few critiques concerning the album from which today’s track has been taken. Some of the negative evaluations claim that the live recordings are vastly inferior to the group’s studio recordings. They also claim that the new lineup was not as good as the original one. I couldn’t agree less.
Although only two (I think) original members featured on the 1968 Cold Wind Blues album are present at this live recording, I can’t say I like the 1971 lineup less. Colwell plays a cool blues on his guitar, and the vocals are as blues-y as they come. The other original group member, Chuck Purro, works the drums to my fullest satisfaction. Add to this the tangible live atmosphere — and you end up with a fine record.
The album Live Bust was recorded at the Phoenix Coffee House in Boston which was closed down by the police after the performance. The announcement that “the  police has just closed the club” can be heard on the last track …
The Colwell-Winfield Blues Band has opened for Led Zeppelin and the group was “most of the band that played on [Led Zeppelin’s] Moondance.”

You might also like:
Albert King — Match Box Blues
Bobby Blue Bland — I Got The Same Old Blues
Johnny Copeland — I Can Tell, Old Man Blues
John Lee Hooker (live) — I’ll Never Get Out Of These Blues …
Blues Thursday with B. B. King and Jimi Hendrix
Posted by Raggedy at 3/31/2011 08:47:00 PM 0 comments  

The Manhattans — Devil In The Dark (video only)

No doubt, The Manhattans are the right choice if one wants to create a “certain” atmosphere. And when I’ve first heard this song, I was wondering, if there ever was a love song these guys didn’t turn into the epitome of lovers in love.

Devil In The Dark is from their 1979 album Love Talk (Columbia Records)

<iframe title=”YouTube video player” width=”480″ height=”390″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/FBE1lPo21m4&#8243; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen>
Posted by Raggedy at 2/26/2011 12:02:00 AM 0 comments  
Labels: 

The Impressions — I’m So Glad

From The Impressions: 1975 – First Impressions (Curtom 1975)
This song should be renamed Hymn to the Homemaker. It sure feels good to see our efforts being appreciated … Yeah, yeah. I know that’s been a long time ago.

Posted by Raggedy at 2/23/2011 01:35:00 AM 0 comments  

Cloudcast — Straight To The Heart

I’m trying out this mixcloud thing. I thought it would be a good idea to post mixcloud broadcasts in the future because the artists will receive royalties from the songs used.

So, here is my first MixCloud.

Posted by Raggedy at 2/21/2011 03:28:00 PM 0 comments
Labels: 

>Charlie Wilson — You Are

>


Sorry. The post/links are no longer available. I forgot that I am not supposed to support artists affiliated with Sony or its subsidiaries w/o getting visits from the Record Industry.  

>Charles Bradley — Lovin’ You Baby

>

It was difficult to pick only one track from this fantastic album. Some of the songs are strongly reminiscent of the great James Brown, and I think neither the Menahan Street Band nor Charles Bradley is trying to hide this fact. The album is a monument to true music: horns, drums, guitars, hammond organ …  And of course it showcases one of the few soulful voices that are left for us hardcore soul fans to admire. 
Yours old Raggedy strongly suggests to get this album; there is not one filler track among the 12 tracks on the album. Daptone has done it again. 
I am posting one of my instant favorites from the CD.
Charles Bradley and The Menahan Street Band, Lovin’ You, Baby (Dunham Records, 2011)
Enjoy!  (Link fixed)
Bio (Also: In Why Is It So Hard, track 10, Charles Bradley sings about his life experience.) 

>Willie John Ellison — Lost The Will To Live

>

More info: here and here
Don’t you love the guitar? 

>Hearts Of Stone — It’s A Lonesome Road

>



I‘m not one who gives much advice — mainly because I could use some of it myself. But this piece of advice is quite safe because proven and true: Steer clear from hearts of stone … they’ll send you on a lonesome road littered with heartache and hurt and regrets. 

>The Minits — Last Mile Of The Way

>

The Minits were three girls from from Montgomery, Alabama who followed in the footsteps of many another vocal group that before them had tried to make it big in the so called Soul City USA, Memphis. They released three singles on the Sounds of Memphis label, but left five more excellent titles lurking in the vaults to be released by the Kent label in 2010 on Follow Your Heart: The Sounds of Memphis Recordings.
These three girls should have been successful. Their talents speak for themselves. But, alas, as so many others before (and after) them, they never made it to the top.

Today’s track is taken from Deep Soul Discoveries Vol. 1

>George Freeman — I’m Like A Fish

>Not much time — New Years Eve party preparations are in progress here. So, I’m just posting a song I like very much.

>Old Skool, New Tool — Tasha Taylor

>Tasha Taylor is the daughter of the great Johnnie Taylor, and I think her dad left her with all the talent he had himself. Just see for yourself.  This young lady has it in her blood.
I wish her all the best and that she’ll be very successful.

>Mike James Kirkland — Together

> Originally from Yazoo City, MS, Mike James Kirkland grew up singing doo wop and gospel. Eventually settling in California, Kirkland and his brother started a record label, Bryan Records, to release the love songs and socially conscious soul music that Kirkland had been writing. The two albums they released — Hang on in There in 1972 and its follow-up, Doin’ It Right — both echoed the style and sentiments of other artists determined to comment on social issues relevant to the African-American community: soul heavies likeMarvin Gaye, Curtis Mayfield, and Stevie Wonder. The reputation of both albums slowly spread over the ensuing years, finally resulting in reissues in the ’90s by archival label Luv N Haight. (allmusic.comhttp://www.allmusic.com/artist/mike-james-kirkland-p205489)


I’ve already posted a song by this artist a while ago. And today while I was writing the last christmas cards, this song came up. I can’t help but wonder why this artist has remained as underrated as he is. 

>A Tint Of Darkness — Don’t Take Your Love From Me

>

Here’s a song by yet another obscure group. 

>The Spinners — Medley: Nothing Stays The Same

>

The Spinners live,  Mighty Love
Breath-taking!

The Spinners Medley:

Enjoy!

>Eddy Senay –Ain’t No Sunshine / Delgado

>

How about making this Saturday a bit funky?

Eddy Senay is another artist whose talent has been lurking neglected and under-rated for whatever unintelligible reason way too long.

I only found about Eddy Senay a few days ago. And what can I say? I love his slow, easy-going style.
Eddy Senay had two albums released for Sussex: Hot Thang in 1972 and Step By Step in 1973. Both albums were re-released on one CD  by Vampi Soul in 2006 titled Eddy Senay, Soul Preachin’. I definitely recommend both to anyone who loves to listen to clean and clear melodic instrumentals with a moderate psychedelic slant.


His career at Sussex was somewhat hindered by his co-existence with Dennis Coffey who had already left his mark on the music scene since the early 60’s, most notably as a member of the Funk Bros. Studio Band. 


Ain’t No Sunshine is from Hot Thang and Delgado from his second album Step By Step.


>Tony Gregory — Only A Fool Breaks His Own Heart

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All  know about Ton Gregory is that he once sang with the famous Skatalites. He also was a songwriter and did some wonderful duets with Marcia Griffiths.

This song is from his Tony Gregory Sings album (Coxsone). Don’t you just love the organ?

>The Isley Bros. — Lover’s Eve

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((Gua)) posted this video clip on the Generationsoul forum, asking for our opinions.
Here’s what I said:
Who is she? She has a very beautiful voice in my opinion, but she ab-uses it as she does her lipstick. At times I didn’t know if she was actually singing or if it was a vocoder (or such a thing) she used. Very weird … As I said before, beautiful voice and very talented — but no charisma (also no grace). Where are the Arethas, Gladys’s, Anitas, Stephanies?
But — I’m happy to see Ron appears to be doing fine.
I liked El DeBarge best; his delivery came closest to re-creating the magic of the Isley’s.
The three tenors were disappointing, though.

And now, I’m going to listen to the REAL stuff. Sounds good


So, here is the real stuff I fled to: 

Love’s Eye is from the Live It Up album (1974, Epic Records)
Some Isley’s live footage

Announcement

I am currently very busy and can’t keep both of my blogs going. Since this blog (second edition) is actually only a back-up version of the original Blogger blog, I will post on the main blog for a while. When things slow down again, I’ll start posting here again. Sorry — but sometimes life gets in the way …

>Yours Until Tomorrow — Irma Thomas / Vivian Reed

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Which one of these two versions do you like better?
You may cast your vote in the sidebar poll box (poll closed on 12/7)

Irma Thomas

Poll results: 50% Irma Thomas, 50% Vivian Reed

Vivian Reed

>James Carr — You Hurt So Good

>There are not many voices as soulful as that of James Carr. This is Soul through and through: horns, background vocals, guitar …

Get his albums here. Btw., rest assured that the 5-star ratings really mean 5 star-quality. 

>Joe Medwick — As Long As There Is Life / Brought Down

>Monday is the perfect day for a deepie. Today’s pick is by Joe Medwick, a singer with  an impressive voice, capable of adapting to a variety of genres. While As Long As There Is Life is without any doubt a deepie, Brought Down is rather funky. Joe delivers both songs, proving he’s at home in both genres.
He was also a highly talented songwriter and wrote many songs for Bobby Blue Bland, for example, for which he never was credited.

The tracks are from I’m An After Hour Man a 1999 re- release of the original record (EDSEL.) Get it! You’ll love the CD. 

For an in-depth bio of Joe Medwick please go to Sir Shambling’s website.

Enjoy! (DivShare is not working at this time — will provide link later) 

>Danny Johnson — How Could You Run Away

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I don’t know much about this artist, and I am wildly guessing when I say I think this is Danny Johnson from the Chi-Lites. Does anyone have a clue? 
The track is from one of Scavanjah’s fantastic Souldies compilations.
Around 1:04, the background vocals are of such a beauty that they sound almost angelic … 

>John Edwards — Exercise My Love

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Gwen and George McCrae — The Rub / Let Your Love Do the Talkin’

Who would have thought that the McCraes did something as funky as this? Certainly not me. These tracks are from their album Together (RCA Schallplatten, Germany, 1975) And don’t you think that Gwen is stealing the show? She has such a sexy voice …

 

Ollie Nightingale — I’m In Love

I always loved this song — and my unrivaled favorite version is the one with Wilson Pickett. Wilson’s powerful delivery  never fails to make my heart beat a little faster. But when I heard Ollie’s version, I got gooseflesh, too. Ollie sure puts a huge portion of emotions into this song.
You’ll find the song on his album Sweet Surrender (Pride, 1973) — available as CD

 

>A Bag Full Of Thank Yous

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Happy Thanksgiving to everyone!

Playlist
Max Romeo — Thank You Lord
Donny Hathaway/June Conquest  — I Thank You
Randy Brown — Thank You For The Happiness
Wilson Williams — I Have A Whole Lot To Be Thankful For
George Jackson — I Just Wanna Thank You

>Gwen and George McCrae — The Rub / Let Your Love Do The Talkin’

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Who would have thought that the McCraes did something as funky as this? Certainly not me. These tracks are from their album Together (RCA Schallplatten, Germany, 1975) And don’t you think that Gwen is stealing the show? She has such a sexy voice … 

>Ollie Nightingale — I’m In Love

>I always loved this song — and my unrivaled favorite version is the one with Wilson Pickett. Wilson’s powerful delivery  never fails to make my heart beat a little faster. But when I heard Ollie’s version, I got gooseflesh, too. Ollie sure puts a huge portion of emotions into this song.
You’ll find the song on his album Sweet Surrender (Pride, 1973) — available as CD 

The great Wilson Pickett, live 

The Moments — Sunday

From their first album Not On The Outside (Billy Brown, lead)


 

 

>The Moments — Sunday

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From their first album Not On The Outside  (Billy Brown, lead)


The Ebonys — Mr. Me, Mrs. You

The Ebonys will forever be remembered for their unforgettable Forever — a song I can listen to all day long without ever tiring of hearing it. Of course, what makes that song so attractive is the raw, emotional, gritty lead voice. And I believe it’s exactly this distinct lead voice that keeps the song from becoming kitschy. Well … The Ebonys were not very successful, and there’s actually only one other song, You’re The Reason Why, that achieved similar recognition than Forever; it climbed to #10 on the R’nB charts in 1971.


You’re The Reason Why, (Ebonys, PIR 1971)

The pick of today is a song from their second album, Sing About Life (Buddah, 1976.) It’s not a song that could be described as exceptional, but it is a nice Philly tune … And yours ol’ Raggedy likes it a lot.

>The Ebonys — Mr. Me , Mrs. You

>The Ebonys will forever be remembered for their unforgettable Forever — a song I can listen to all day long without ever tiring of hearing it. Of course, what makes that song so attractive is the raw, emotional, gritty lead voice. And I believe it’s exactly this distinct lead voice that keeps the song from becoming kitschy. Well … The Ebonys were not very successful, and there’s actually only one other song, You’re The Reason Why, that achieved similar recognition than Forever; it climbed to #10 on the R’nB charts in 1971.


You’re The Reason Why, (Ebonys, PIR 1971)

The pick of today is a song from their second album, Sing About Life (Buddah, 1976.) It’s not a song that could be described as exceptional, but it is a nice Philly tune … And yours ol’ Raggedy likes it a lot. 

>Haze — I Do Love My Lady (rare, obscure)

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This title is from a 1974 album by a group that had been forgotten for decades. One day, a lucky vinyl collector DJ got her hands on it — and voila! Here is a beautiful track from a resurrected album. 

If you’d like to read the whole story, please go here.




>Gene Chandler — You Threw A Lucky Punch

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      LimeLinx
Today may be the lucky day! 

Jimmy Radcliffe — Feels Like Lovin’

There’s a whole lot of talk about Jimmy’s Long After Tonight Is Over, and I agree that song is great, but I didn’t fall in love with it at first listen. It was Feels Like Lovin’ that made my heart skip a beat or two. (Such precious gems are to be found on Barry’s Vintage Soul Radio Show)

You’ll find a detailed bio. about the artist at Barry Fowden’s Soul Cellar archives.

Long After Tonight Is Over

 

>Jimmy Radcliffe — Feels Like Lovin’ (unreleased)

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There’s a whole lot of talk about Jimmy’s Long After Tonight Is Over, and I agree that song is great, but I didn’t fall in love with it at first listen. It was Feels Like Lovin’ that made my heart skip a beat or two. (Such precious gems are to be found on Barry’s Vintage Soul Radio Show)

You’ll find a detailed bio. about the artist at Barry Fowden’s Soul Cellar archives.

Long After Tonight Is Over

Lou Rawls — Your Good Thing

Lou Rawls “Your Good Thing”

Lou Rawls is perhaps the quintessential R&B artist. Although he is probably most remembered for his time with Philly International, Lou was an established artist long before he found wide fame and acceptance with Gamble and Huff. See his full history Lou Rawls Bio
I didn’t know that he had a 4 octave range, wow. I think of him as a superb baritone who’s phrasing and legendary sound is immediately recognized and is unsurpassed in the music industry.
This is a song released 1969 that I absolutely love “Your Good Thing” Listen to the pathos and earnestness that Lou conveys.

If you would like to hear it on your computer Click here

>Lou Rawls "Your Good Thing"

>Lou Rawls is perhaps the quintessential R&B artist. Although he is probably most remembered for his time with Philly International, Lou was an established artist long before he found wide fame and acceptance with Gamble and Huff. See his full history Lou Rawls Bio
I didn’t know that he had a 4 octave range, wow. I think of him as a superb baritone who’s phrasing and legendary sound is immediately recognized and is unsurpassed in the music industry.
This is a song released 1969 that I absolutely love “Your Good Thing” Listen to the pathos and earnestness that Lou conveys.

If you would like to hear it on your computer Click here

>Additional Serving — 70’s Greats live

>Yesterday, I was listening to so much Philly Sound I woke up with kind of a hangover this morning … At least that’s how it felt. So, I eased the pain with another dose of TSOP — and here is a clip I found while I was rummaging YouTube for more and more and more  of my favorite sound.

>AdioBlog#16_TheBluesInsideMe

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Playlist

In The Mood (Instrumental) — Big Walter Horton
Reap What You Sow — Mose Vinson
She Comes To See Me Sometime — Joe Hill Louis
Sitting On A Poor Man’s Throne — Bobby Blue Bland
My Bottle Is My Companion — Percy Mayfield
 Weekend Love — Clarence Carter

The Marvelows — In The Morning

This is an update of/addition to the Sly, Slick and Wicked post:

Thanks To Raggedy she reminded me of this song by The Marvelows.Here is their bio The Marvelows Raggedy posted this sung by the Sly Slick and The Wicked. I remembered it by the Marvelows who actually sung it in 1968. Here is their original version.


I like this version better, being a harmony freak I particularly like what the 1st tenor does at the end. I stated in the previous in the comments section that I thought that SL&W’s harmony was better based on memory. I take that back The original (this one) is the better of the two. I’m torn on the lead singing, what do you think?

I like this version better, being a harmony freak I particularly like what the 1st tenor does at the end. I stated in the previous in the comments section that I thought that SL&W’s harmony was better based on memory. I take that back The original (this one) is the better of the two. I’m torn on the lead singing, what do you think?


>Luther Vandross — I’ll Get Along Fine

>From one of Luther’s two pre-soloist album Luther comes this track. Again, I have to thank ((Soultaker)) for pointing out this gem of an album to me. (Also see my previous post.)

R.I.P Luther 

>The Marvelows "In The Morning"

>Thanks To Raggedy she reminded me of this song by The Marvelows.Here is their bio The Marvelows Raggedy posted this sung by the Sly Slick and The Wicked. I remembered it by the Marvelows who actually sung it in 1968. Here is their original version.

I like this version better, being a harmony freak I particularly like what the 1st tenor does at the end. I stated in the previous in the comments section that I thought that SL&W’s harmony was better based on memory. I take that back The original (this one) is the better of the two. I’m torn on the lead singing, what do you think?

>Smooth Soul

>Posted by Gua…….

The loss of true baritone singing bothers me, the loss of true smooth R&B irritates me. So I’m on a mission to point out to these musically deprived young-ins what good music is all about.
Miles Jaye is perhaps one of the last of the recent gifted baritones (with the exception of Will Downing), this cut is from the very hard, but now very expensive HERE to find CD entitled “Irresistible”. This was released in 1989 just before the rise of melisma-crazed,nasal singing became the norm. but I digress, Enjoy the sound of smooth R&B!!

If you would like to listen to this on your computer Click here

Raggedy, Thank you for lettingmebemyself

>Maxine Brown — I’m In Love

>Here is a song that brings me to my knees when sung by Wilson Pickett. He, of course, had sung it convincingly enough to make his audience wonder if he really had just fallen in love.
The recording of the song by Maxine Brown is very nice, too.

Here’s the one and only Wilson Pickett (glitter suit and all)

Here’s Maxine’s version.

>Luther Ingram — Run For Your Life

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At the end of this month, Luther Ingram would have turned 73. Of course, there probably doesn’t exist one single Soul music lover who does not know his signature song If Loving You Is Right (I Don’t Want To Be Right). That song is as deep and southern as a song can get which isn’t surprising at all since Luther was from Tennessee. That he could easily switch to the opposite pole of Soul, namely the Northern style, he shows in today’s pick, Run For Your Life. You’ll find the title on one of the many Northern Soul compilations; the album is called Totally Northern Soul – 25 Classic Forgotten Northern Oldies.

Get the compilation here

John Lee Hooker (live) — I’ll Never Get Out Of These Blues Alive

Here comes J. L. Hooker — and with him are Otis Spann on the piano. Muddy Waters, Sammy Lawhorn and Luther Johnson are playing some fine guitar tunes. Francis Clay on the drums and Mac Arnold plays the bass. This track is from a 1966 live recording at the Cafe au Go Go in New City. Recordings like these don’t leave any doubt as to why the man became the legend he is.

John Lee Hooker – Live at the Cafe au Go-Go

    (New York City, August 30th, 1966)
    01 I’m Bad Like Jesse James.mp3
    02 She’s Long, She’s tall ( She Weeos Like A Willow Tree).mp3
    03 When My First Wife Left Me.mp3
    04 Heartaches and Misery.mp3
    05 One Bourbon, One Scotch And One Beer.mp3
    06 I Don’t Want No Trouble.mp3
    07 I’ll Never Get Out Of These Blues Alive.mp3
    08 Seven days.mp3

 

Carrie Cleveland — Love Will Set You Free

Wednesday needs to be a happy, hopping day.

Now this song gets me out of my chair and has me dance … It’s got that fantastic beat, and Carrie Cleveland’s voice is captivating. Isn’t it?

 

 

>Carrie Cleveland — Love Will Set You Free

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Wednesday needs to be a happy, hopping day.
Now this song gets me out of my chair and has me dance … It’s got that fantastic beat, and Carrie Cleveland’s voice is captivating. Isn’t it?

Tony Fox — I Wanna Get Next To You

Today is election day — please don’t forget! No matter what party you’re going to vote for, go cast your vote. And do it because YOU are convinced about doing the right thing — don’t let polls, papers or people influence your decision.

Okay back to the most important thing on earth:  M U S I C

Here’s a title from yet another obscure artist: Tony Fox. I’ve never heard of him until I found this album on the Here Only Good Music blog.

 

 

>Tony Fox — I Wanna Get Next To You

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Today is election day — please don’t forget! No matter what party you’re going to vote for, go cast your vote. And do it because YOU are convinced about doing the right thing — don’t let polls, papers or people influence your decision.
Okay back to the most important thing on earth:  M U S I C
Here’s a title from yet another obscure artist: Tony Fox. I’ve never heard of him until I found this album on the Here Only Good Music blog.

George Jackson — There Goes My Pride / Let Them Know You Care

 

George Jackson, born in Indianola, MS in 1945 was not only a great singer but also a prolific songwriter. Growing up the southern way, he was of course exposed to the finest Gospel singers, including Sam Cooke, The Soul Stirrers and The Staple Singers.

Ike Turner had him record his first 45 in New Orleans: Won’t Nobody Cha-Cha With Me. Jackson’s first “recognisable” single came out in 1965 and was titled There Goes My Pride.

There Goes My Pride (Dot, 1965)

Let Them Know You Care (Hi Records, 1973)

Lime Linx

 

 

>George Jackson — There Goes My Pride / Let Them Know You Care

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George Jackson, born in Indianola, MS in 1945 was not only a great singer but also a prolific songwriter. Growing up the southern way, he was of course exposed to the finest Gospel singers, including Sam Cooke, The Soul Stirrers and The Staple Singers.
 Ike Turner had him record his first 45 in New Orleans: Won’t Nobody Cha-Cha With Me. Jackson’s first “recognisable” single came out in 1965 and was titled There Goes My Pride.

There Goes My Pride (Dot, 1965)
Let Them Know You Care (Hi Records, 1973)

(If you’d like to know more  about this outstanding artist, please go to Sir Shambling’s website.)

>Danny Moore — Somebody New

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When this title played in my i-tunes library, I had that how-come-I-never-noticed-it-before moments. I couldn’t help but feel for a moment that this voice resembled so much that of Paul Williams from the Temptations.
I don’t know anything about Danny Moore — but I know he could sing. This track went straight into my favs. section.